Condo – 2 Grant St Unit 1 Stoneham, MA 02180 is now new to the market!

This Impeccable Townhouse offers 3 floors of living space, an open layout living room, dining room & the bright & beautiful kitchen…Stainless steel appliances, white cabinets & granite counters…all in a residential neighborhood setting. Gleaming hardwood floors through out the first floor, high ceilings, custom built-in cabinet, central air, and energy-efficient windows. Upstairs has two spacious bedrooms, generous closets including two in the Master bedroom, a linen closet and a full bath. The basement has a nicely finished family room/play room plus additional storage and workshop area. Enjoy those beautifl days/nights on the back deck or playing in the back yard. If you are searching for a townhouse with low condo fees that feels like you are living in a single family home, then move right in! Just minutes from Rte 93 or 128 (95), town center, the Stoneham Theatre, Farmers’ Market, and so much more! Perfect for entertaining, first time buyer or someone looking to downsize.

This is a Townhouse/Half-Duplex style home and features 5 total rooms, 1 full bath, 1 half bath, 2 bedrooms, and is currently available for $419,900.

For complete details click here.

Is House-Flipping For You?

Image by Andy Dean Photography from Shutterstock

In past housing markets, it was common for investors to flip houses. Unfortunately, when the housing bubble burst, many buyers couldn’t update and sell the homes they’d bought. After a bit of a downturn, the trend has picked back up. However, savvy investors know that the housing market has much tighter margins than it has in the past. If you’re thinking about getting into the house-flipping game, consider the following tips as you get started.

Here are some tips to protect your potential investment:

  • Not every housing market is profitable: Many homes can be purchased, renovated, and potentially sold in every part of the country. But some locations do not have the sort of economic growth that makes property flipping viable. Know your market and local property values. Keep in touch with what’s happening in the community and be prepared with a plan B in case the home doesn’t sell.

  • Do your homework. There are fewer deeply discounted homes available to investors. Plan to pay the full price in cash but arrange a contingency to have the home inspected. If the inspection reveals issues, especially with primary systems such as electrical and plumbing, walk away. Or, offer the seller a lower price to account for needed repairs, and potentially get a better deal. Anything revealed during the inspection that the seller did not fix your responsibility to repair or replace before you can flip the property.

  • Respect your margins. Unlike in reality shows the profit made from buying and selling a home is not as large as it appears. When you find undervalued homes, you need a cushion built-in for the rehab. If the difference between what you paid and the new selling price is insignificant, it’s not a sound investment. Avoid purchasing property that requires thousands of dollars of repairs or upgrades. You’ll end up with a lovely home, but little to no income to show from it.

  • Constantly monitor the inventory. Fewer homes on the market mean finding one with flip potential is more difficult. 

Seek help from a professional

Maintain a close relationship with your real estate professional so that when potential homes come on the market, you’re the first to hear. Your real estate professionals know the local market. They watch the trends and know who is buying, who is selling, and who is holding. They also know which repairs and upgrades are essential to make a quick sale. Let them guide you.

Make Sure the House You Buy Has Security Features

One aspect of house hunting that some prospective home buyers overlook is security. Perhaps it’s because they’re looking at homes in “nice neighborhoods, where you shouldn’t have to worry about that sort of thing happening.” Maybe another reason they’re paying little or no attention to security issues is that they’re more preoccupied with the layout of the kitchen, the size of the backyard, and the condition of the master bathroom.

Even though there are dozens of details to compare and think about when you’re house hunting, security features are important enough to include in your checklist. By letting your real estate agent know that home security is a high priority for you, they’ll hopefully point out security features that they notice and perhaps ask the listing agent for any additional information on things like installed alarms systems, deadbolt locks, or security lighting on the property.

As a side note, if the present owner has recently installed an extensive security system in the house, you can also use that as an opportunity (excuse) to inquire about crime in the neighborhood and whether there have been any recent incidents in the area. Additional research may need to be done to ferret out that information.

As you check out different houses that your buyers’ agent shows you, here are a few security-related checkpoints to keep in mind:

  • Do the doors look solid and are they secured by deadbolt locks?
  • Do first-floor windows have functional and securely locking mechanisms?
  • Are there any outside floodlights, lamp posts, and/or other forms of illumination around the house?
  • Are there any overgrown bushes next to the house that could conceal a burglar’s attempt to enter the house through a window?
  • Are there any fences on the premises that might discourage a burglar from entering the property?
  • Do the main entrances have locking storm doors that provide an extra layer of security?
  • Are there any other security vulnerabilities that you or your real estate agent think need addressing, either now or in the immediate future?

While that list may not include every possible security feature and potential weakness to look for when touring homes for sale, it will hopefully heighten your awareness about the need to prioritize home security — even before you actually close on a house and move in.

When you do find the ultimate house for you and your family, it’s always a good idea to change the locks on all external doors as soon as possible. You never know how many duplicate keys have been circulated over the years to contractors, neighbors, cleaning people, pet sitters, house sitters, and family members. One way to take control of your new home’s security situation is to make sure there are no extra house keys floating around in the hands of people you don’t know.